Indeed, this is a film that brings to life such boring Biology class topics as the food chain by slapping you right in the middle of a feeding frenzy. Read about our approach to external linking. One of these geysers might even hold the secret to all life on earth. On the desert wastes of the abyss, a whale carcass generates a frenzy as slow-moving sharks as big as great whites fight for what may be their first meal in a year. From here we journey on down to the deepest place on earth - the Mariana Trench - almost 11 kilometres from the surface, a vast chasm that ruptures the deep sea floor. Tectonic plates rip apart or collide in mighty clashes. We have barely begun to explore it, and yet it is the largest living space on the planet. Scientists already think that there is more life in the deep than anywhere else on Earth. Of course, those who remember the days when wildlife films were regularly shown before main features might feel a little nostalgic watching Deep Blue. This is no Disney-fied documentary, however. Watch now. Deep Blue is a little let down by Michael Gambon’s narration, which is so sparse that one wonders why the directors didn’t do away with it altogether. Visit OpenLearn, the OU’s home of free learning, to learn more about the oceans, Read articles and watch clips showing how we created the series, Join us for a deeper look into each episode of Blue Planet II, Attenborough: World 'changing habits' on plastic (BBC News). Yet even eight kilometres down, where the basic chemistry of life was once thought impossible, we find strange species swimming through the darkness. Deep Blue is a little let down by Michael Gambon’s narration, which is so sparse that one wonders why the directors didn’t do away with it altogether. Food is hard to come by and finding a mate is even harder, but life adapts in ingenious ways. We encounter savage hordes of Humboldt squid hunting lanternfish in the depths and coral gardens flourishing in absolute darkness, with more species of coral to be found in the deep than on shallow tropical reefs. Deep Blue is every bit the equal of its acclaimed forerunners. Shrimps hover on the fringes of billowing clouds of volcanic chemicals, so hot they could melt lead. The Deep . We discover new species every time we visit these strange new worlds. The deeper you go, the more extreme conditions become. The deep can be a violent place. The wildlife documentary series narrated by David Attenborough goes on groundbreaking journey to the deepest parts of the oceans. This episode takes us on an epic journey into the unknown, a realm that feels almost like science fiction. And while many of the animals here are familiar, both the locations and the clarity of the camerawork represent foreign territory. Of course, those who remember the days when wildlife films were regularly shown before main features might feel a little nostalgic watching Deep Blue. The wildlife documentary series narrated by David Attenborough goes on groundbreaking journey to the deepest parts of … Hair-covered crabs feed on gushing plumes of otherwise toxic hydrogen sulphide. The deep is perhaps the most hostile environment on Earth, at least to us - a world of crushing pressure, brutal cold and utter darkness. From Jacques Cousteau’s Oscar-winning features The Silent World and World Without Sun to Luc Besson’s bends-inducingAtlantis, the big screen is the natural place to document the wide expanses of the high seas. To say that the animals and incidents they encounter produce intense drama is like calling the Pacific a paddling pool. We discover alien worlds, bizarre creatures and extraordinary new behaviours never seen before. Movie25 - Watch FULL HD Quality 1080/720p movies and latest tv series online for free, download the latest movies without registration at FreeMovie25 | Movie25. This is literally as close as you will get to exploring the depths this side of stealing a submarine. There are fish that walk instead of swim, worms that feed exclusively on bones and shrimps that spend almost their entire lives imprisoned with their mate in a cage of crystal sponge. Such a flaw is, however, but a drop in the ocean. And at these volcanic hotspots, extraordinary micro-worlds blossom into life, completely divorced from the energy of the sun. Such a flaw is, however, but a drop in the ocean. Effectively a compilation of the most memorable and dramatic moments from the acclaimed BBC series ‘The Blue Planet’, Andy Byatt and Alastair Fothergill’s film marries the vigour of an action film with the sweep of epic cinema. YEAR: 2003 | LENGTH: 1 part (90 minutes)  |  SOURCE: WEBSITE. There’s no forced comedy or tortured melodrama. All ocean life is here, from dolphin and shark to shrimp and penguin, from the beasts that live on the very fringes of the sea to the monsters that can be only found in the sunless fathoms. Instead, Byatt and Fothergill have simply recorded what they encountered while going where few men have gone before. Bon appetit. At a hydrothermal vent system in the middle of the Atlantic, seawater and rock react under extreme pressures and temperatures to produce complex hydrocarbons - the building blocks of life itself. Only three human beings have ever reached here, and yet there is still life to be found in these deep sea trenches. The sheer weight of water above creates almost unendurable pressures. Cinema has long had an interest in the might and majesty of the open sea. Scientists have named this strange place the Lost City, and many believe that it was at a place just like this that life on earth first began, four billion years ago.

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